Inflation has been barely noticeable for quite a while, but as Rehoboth Beach, DE shoppers have begun to notice how it’s been creeping up lately. For Rehoboth Beach, DE landlords, that triggers a subject that directly impacts the profitability of their real estate investment.

Managing rent increases properly—and communicating them in a manner calculated to preserve your tenants’ goodwill—is a subject estate author Kevin Ortner writes about in Realtor Magazine. A few of his insights:

·         Raise rents on a regular schedule—usually, this will come at each lease renewal period (or when the agreement specifies)—but for month-to-month situations, once a year is recommended. Small increments on an annual basis are more predictable (and agreeable) than “catch up” raises scheduled less frequently.

·         Be competitive. The “sweet spot” you are looking for is the best price you can get for your rental—which is also actually “how much tenants are willing to pay.” That’s subject to compliance with Rehoboth Beach, DE and local laws in accordance with the terms of your lease. Research by starting with a look at the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ annual calculation of Shelter Cost Changes—most recently, 3.4% at the end of August. The national trends are good to know but are not as significant as the more important data: the rates similar Rehoboth Beach, DE rentals are currently advertising.

·         Give extra notice. You’re required to abide by the law and your lease, but when you give tenants more time, it makes any raise less burdensome. If the raise is competitive, tenants will have ample time to shop around and see that it’s reasonable.

·         Work to keep good tenants happy. The most successful landlords frequently take their best tenants’ situations into consideration. If you decide to cut them some slack as a way of cultivating the relationship, you might even do what Ortner suggests: “show them what the rent increase was going to be”—but with that number crossed out and a smaller one in its place. You should also have determined the operating cost rises behind the rent increase, and be willing to share those facts.

The Ortner prescriptions are aimed at maximizing profitability by keeping rent increases rational—and tenant-landlord communications open. If you have ever considered the investment potential of becoming a landlord yourself, right now is a terrific time to investigate the opportunities our Rehoboth Beach, DE market is offering. Give me a call—I’ll show you what I mean! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

 Buyers and sellers are more well-informed than ever before due to easy access to online Rehoboth Beach, DE real estate sites (like mine—and BTW, thanks for stopping by!). Given the advent of constantly updated listing data and the abundance of accompanying commentary and analysis, it’s no surprise that the level of real estate sophistication is significantly higher than it was even just a few years ago. It also means that more members of the general public are likely to find themselves in the puzzling presence of some real estate alphabet soup that haunts realms formerly visited only by real estate and mortgage industry professionals.

True: it’s easy to query Google to decipher acronyms like “DHSC.” But then you’ll have to wade through red herrings like “Doctor of Health Sciences” and “Defense and Homeland Security Consortium”—or even Deployment Health Surveillance Capability (that’s from Munich, Germany, but it’s listed as a possibility). Real estate’s “DHSC” is short for Direct Home Selling Costs”—meaning the combined selling expenses (carrying costs, loss on sale, repairs and improvements, commission, closing costs, etc.) all lumped together in one succinct 4-letter package.

Here are some common real estate-related acronyms you may come across from time to time:

HUD/RESPA—The statement you get at the closing table which spells out all the monies paid out and received: short for “Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act.”

PMI—The kind of insurance borrowers pay for home loans of more than 80% of the property’s value: short for “Private Mortgage Insurance.”

TOM-When a listing is taken off the market because of illness, travel, repairs, etc.: “Temporarily Off Market.”

PITI—the four parts that make up monthly mortgage payments: “Principal, Interest, Taxes, Insurance.”

IDX—the technical term used in connection with real estate search sites that display the parts of Multiple Listing Service information that’s marked for public access: “Internet Data Exchange.”

APR—the by-now familiar term which takes all of the costs of generating a loan and combines them into a single percentage number: “Annual Percentage Rate.”

There are a whole mini-dictionary’s worth of other real estate terms and acronyms, but if you are one of Rehoboth Beach, DE’s buyers or sellers, you usually won’t have to deal with many of them. Not so “CMA”—that’s the “Comparative Market Analysis” I’ll provide to help brainstorm the best asking price for your property. Call me for that one when it’s time to think about selling! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

Especially when the market is moving briskly, selling your Rehoboth Beach, DE home can put you up against a chicken-egg quandary. “Which came first?” is as unanswerable today as when we argued about in the second grade—yet when a key decision about selling your home depends on answering a similar puzzler, it’s anything but whimsical.

The metaphor is almost exact. If you know you will be buying a new house but haven’t yet sold your current Rehoboth Beach, DE home, which comes first?

As for the new purchase, the universally agreed upon best practice for house-hunting is to be able to produce a lender’s preapproval for X dollars.

So selling your Rehoboth Beach, DE home has to come first, right?

But if you need to have sold your home before you get serious about finding a new one—what if the tight market means it may take a while to find the right home at the price you’re looking for? Selling your current home usually means committing to moving out at a date that’s fast approaching!

So that means locking up the new home comes first, right?

The answer is to have faith that—unlike the chicken-egg riddle—generations of Rehoboth Beach, DE buyers and sellers have successfully solved the dilemma. It involves a number of working parts including the particulars of your current financial profile, a formulation of the post-sale net proceeds, and a properly constructed pre-approval letter that will be contingent on the successful closing.

Although you could put all those parts together yourself, that’s hardly necessary. It’s a piece of cake once you’ve enlisted the services of the Rehoboth Beach, DE professionals who deal with these issues all the time: a team including your knowledgeable Rehoboth Beach, DE Realtor® and an experienced local mortgage professional. Call me whenever you need to solve any similar Rehoboth Beach, DE real estate dilemma. I’ll be at your side to help protect something else: your nest egg! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

There’s news on the real estate value estimating front (robotic version).

For any kind of Delaware real estate activity—whether you are buying or selling; financing or refinancing; whether for your family residence or as an investment—there are at least two value estimation figures that determine how the Delaware transaction is likely to fare.

The first is a value estimate that you come up with: a dollar amount that reflects what the subject property is worth to you. That’s a calculation likely to be based on some mix of the property’s features, your own personal tastes, and your financial profile and outlook. If I’m your Realtor®, it will also be greatly influenced by the research I prepare for you: the real-world values of all the latest comparable transactions that have been taking place locally—along with the asking prices of similar properties.

That figure is one thing, but the second kind is an actual appraisal—the estimate that lenders use as the collateral value for the Delaware property. That estimate is the one a professional appraiser calculates using guidelines and formulas that have been painstakingly developed over time. It’s fortuitous when the first number comes close to the professional estimate—and I’m happy to say that it’s often the case.

But since 2006 there has been a third kind of Delaware real estate value estimate—one that’s increasingly mentioned in news of real estate controversies. This is the “Zestimate” offered by the website data company Zillow: a number that is arrived at via an automated system that assembles publicly available data. It’s stated purpose is “to aid potential buyers in assessing market value of a given property.” Unlike the painstaking reports that certified assessors create for a fee, Zestimates are widely disseminated to everyone for free. There is one problem, which I’ve mentioned before: the figures may be misleading.

Although Zillow claims an “incredibly low” national median error rate of 5%, last June they hailed a new improved algorithm that dropped the rate to 6.1%” [that’s not a typo: 6.1% is indeed a larger error rate than the still-claimed 5%]. Worse yet, research shows that in 10% of the cases examined, the error was 20% plus or minus…so a home with an actual fair market value of $300,000 could show a Zestimate of anywhere from $240,000 to $360,000!

Given that possibility, it’s probably no wonder that Zillow has announced a $1 million prize “to the person or team who can most improve the Zestimate” formula. MarketWatch points out that the contest was announced “just a week after a class action suit was filed against them” for offering unlicensed appraisals that hurt business—but the company claims the timing is just a coincidence.

Delaware real estate buyers and sellers will undoubtedly continue to be amused by those Zestimates when they see them, but the more knowledgeable keep in mind that they can constitute eye-rolling mistakes. When your own Delaware real world real estate affairs are in the offing, better to give me a call for information that won’t include any misleading automated miscalculations. Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com