If you’re a frequent visitor here, it will come as no surprise that those of us whose days are devoted to the Rehoboth Beach, DE real estate industry aren’t shy about championing the virtues of homeownership. We’re aided by more than a century’s worth of wit and wisdom directed to the merits of owning the place where you live.

America’s two most storied humorists contributed to the collection. There is Mark Twain’s “Buy land—they’re not making it anymore” and Will Rogers’ “Don’t wait to buy real estate. Buy real estate and wait.” Then there is Anthony Trollop, the classic English novelist’s wry “Land is about the only thing that can’t fly away.”

You can credit other real estate witticisms to more modern celebrities—like “The best time to buy a home is always five years ago.” (The late jazz great Ray Brown gets credit for that one).

The real estate-promoting commonplaces don’t just come from writers and entertainers, either. Take President Franklin Roosevelt’s “Real estate can’t be lost or stolen…managed with reasonable care, it is about the safest investment in the world.” Abraham Lincoln could have been the nation’s first sub-divider with his “I am in favor of cutting up the wild lands into parcels, so that every poor man may have a home.”

 Today’s Rehoboth Beach, DE real estate may be a far cry from Honest Abe’s “wild lands”—but the insight from America’s first billionaire, J. Paul Getty, is as apt today as it was when he described “current real estate” in the mid-20th century: “Real estate prices have risen because a constantly increasing population with money to invest…continues to be created.” When you combine that maxim with Mark Twain’s observation, you emerge with the humorous-because-it’s-true wisdom that continues to ring true—just as it has for centuries. 

For help in evaluating the great opportunities among today’s Rehoboth Beach, DE real estate offerings—call me! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

Rehoboth Beach, DE’s week starts off with Monday’s federal income tax filing deadline—AKA, Tax Day. Rehoboth Beach, DE’s Tax Day may not be the kind of annual observance that people look forward to—although for homeowners at least, it does serve as a glorious reminder of the value of the home loan interest deduction. Then, too, for Rehoboth Beach, DE’s non-procrastinators, a second positive may already have been experienced with the early arrival of a U.S. Treasury refund check.

Along those lines, last Friday the IRS put out a news flash noting that a third of taxpayers had yet to file their returns. Of the 153 million individual returns Uncle Sam expects to receive for tax year 2018, 50,000,000 had yet to be filed. That meant that for many Rehoboth Beach, DE residents, the weekend was spent with less time devoted to the pro basketball and hockey playoffs or the  Master’s golf tournament. Instead, teeth-gnashing encounters with the income tax forms had taken place—sometimes resulting in Automatic Extension form filings.

As a side note, taxpayers in Maine and Massachusetts get until April 17 to file because of their Patriots’ Day—a legal holiday celebrating the first battles of the Revolutionary War. Why two days instead of one? That’s because Tuesday is Emancipation Day in Washington D.C., and the IRS can’t require that anybody’s tax return be filed when they aren’t open for business. For residents in those two states, it must be nice to know that (at least when he’s got the day off) Uncle Sam keeps his hands in his own pockets.

If your own Tax Day has been observed without that vital home loan interest tax break, there’s next year to think about. Call me! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

You can’t blame Rehoboth Beach, DE residents who’ve been bamboozled in the past for having grown cautious as April 1 approached. They braced themselves for this Monday, knowing that the practical jokers will have been hard at work concocting 2019’s April Fools Day tricks. There would be spoof ads, fake headlines, and who-knows-what else? to watch out for.

That’s why you could hardly fault those who instantly dismissed last Friday’s banner headline in the Wall Street Journal. It might be unfair to print an April Fools prank ahead of time—but pranksters have done that before.

And the article certainly bore all the earmarks: an almost believable premise (slightly understated to build credulity) followed by the requisite goofy supporting specifics. Maybe it wasn’t as wild a story as one the Onion might foist off—but it did add the kind of ridiculous details that would set up a satisfying “APRIL FOOLS!” payoff. 

The 4% Mortgage Is Back! was the shocking headline—followed by the parody subhead, “Its Biggest Drop in Over a Decade.” The supporting text talked about mortgage rates “fast approaching 4%”—rates “so low” that “economists and lenders believe it will help jump-start the housing market again”!

For Rehoboth Beach, DE real estate watchers who have been following actual Rehoboth Beach, DE mortgage interest rates over the past few years, the overwrought details would have been a sure tipoff that pranksters were at work. A full quarter point sheared off of home mortgage rates in a single week? That (as the article explained) might constitute “the biggest drop in over a decade”—but to any reasonably well-informed reader, it would surely also confirm that the April Fools writers were in charge. The graph that accompanied was evidence that the Journal artists were in on the joke. Its gradual rise and sudden plunge looked more like a diagram of going over Niagara Falls in a barrel than of a realistic rate chart.

The final surprise proved to be—well, it actually proved to be on readers who thought they’d spotted an April Fools Day gag. The article was real. It appeared in Friday’s print edition as “Mortgage Rates Fall Toward 4%”—and the information was, however improbable, 100% accurate.

It was also a great practical development for the already-lively Rehoboth Beach, DE market and Rehoboth Beach, DE home buyers and sellers. Another not April Fools Day idea: call me! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

 When it comes to industries, you’d have to place Rehoboth Beach real estate into the “stolid” category. The rules are set and agreed-upon. Everything having to do with real estate is entirely “real”—the opposite of “imaginary.” Certainly not frivolous, fleeting, or mercurial.

Major changes don’t come about often or quickly. It is true that one facet of the way real estate business is conducted has undergone a noticeable change due to the web. But that is actually only a shift in how clients find and qualify properties they might be interested in. They still overwhelmingly rely on real estate professionals to take responsibility for the consequential details of buying and selling.

But wait!

A new technology suddenly presents the possibility of making a substantial difference when it comes to new homes—one that might come to pass pretty quickly. It promises to shave as much as 30% off the total cost of constructing new Rehoboth Beach homes. If and when that gets real, it’s hard not to envision widespread repercussions .

The technology involved is 3-D printing—up until now, a technology that has been confined to a ‘gee whiz’ futuristic corner of the residential construction industry. But if Texas startup Icon, Inc. is to be believed, by the end of this year, it will be producing printers that can create up to 2,000 square foot bungalows in a matter of days. That’s 80% of today’s average-size home.

Their Vulcan II is a machine that can print concrete walls as wide as 28 feet and 8 ½ feet high—in any number of patterns. An automatic mixer pumps concrete into the printer, which pours it into place (actually, it squeezes it out “like icing on a cake”). Following the programmed blueprint, it leaves precise voids for electrical wiring, plumbing, windows, and doors, all of which are conventionally installed. Material wastage is all but eliminated. Today as much as a third of conventional materials typically end up in the trash.

This might seem more sci-fi than reality, but the photos of the printer in action that accompanied the Wall Street Journal’s writeup make that unlikely. To be sure, technical barriers will have to be overcome before we’re likely to see 3-D printed new homes in Rehoboth Beach—but the effect of a substantial reverse in the skyrocketing costs of new construction could well make affordable housing more than a political rallying cry. HUD secretary Ben Carson calls it “a game changer.”

Keeping abreast of Rehoboth Beach’s new and existing home market allows me to provide my clients guidance that’s timely—and sometimes critical. Call me anytime! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com