There aren’t a lot more important aspects to selling a home than the Big One: pricing.

Pricing Lewes, DE real estate—setting an asking price that attracts a horde of qualified buyers without having set a figure that leaves too much on the table—is often referred to as an art. But when you think of pricing as art rather than science, I think that shortchanges its mathematical underpinnings. “Science” may even play a greater role—but it’s a soft science, one hedged by experience. In real estate, it’s one of those areas where experience is vital—but communication is important, too.

The starting point for pricing is the research that goes into a comparables inquiry. The “comps” yield hard numbers: prices paid recently for similar Lewes, DE homes, prices asked and paid per square foot, days on the market spent at different price points, etc. Only after those figures are known is it possible to integrate experience—the “art” part of pricing. This comes with accurately assessing the temperature (depth and momentum) of the current marketplace.

There is one more step before setting the final asking price—one that takes into account the seller’s level of motivation. If speed is a very high priority, it will be an adjustment aimed at PTSN!: “Priced to Sell Now!” If absolute top dollar is most important, TOM pricing will prevail: “Top of Market.” Determining a price that accurately captures the seller’s intention is the blend of art and science that’s at the heart of setting optimal pricing.

When you choose the real estate professional who will bring your own Lewes, DE property to market, it pays to be mindful of how art, science, experience, and the ability to listen all play a role in the process of correctly pricing Lewes, DE real estate. I hope you’ll consider me when the time arrives! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

Any Lewes, DE home sale, like everything else, tends to go better when preparation has been carefully thought out—and then acted upon. For homeowners who suspect that they will be selling sooner or later, there are some planning steps that can be taken long ahead of time.

Some Lewes, DE real estate planning is the long-range variety. The first thing the canniest new homeowners do is to take a look at the property with an eye to improving its landscape design, and plant trees. Even if they take a decade to mature, that’s an action that can pay huge dividends later.

There are other real estate planning actions that don’t take years to start bearing dividends. Take the example of household utilities. The issue here is the bills that begin to appear in the mailbox (or computer’s In-box) within a month of moving in. What might seem to be a background irritant at first may rear its ugly head with greater impact later, when a sale is impending. Particularly if and when energy prices escalate—a not-unlikely possibility.

Any Lewes, DE real estate plan takes buyers’ concerns into account—and today, many prospective buyers are mindful of the real impact operating costs have on a family budget. They ask to see a year’s worth of utility bills before making an offer. Since those bills are a matter of record, it’s not an unreasonable request. But if the energy and water expenses are sky-high, they are bound to reflect in the size of the offer. If they’re off-putting enough, they can even result in the worst offer: none at all!

The takeaway is simple but important. Where utilities are concerned, the best real estate planning is to minimize the chunk they take out of the family budget. That may involve the financial pain of making a non-emergency upgrade (like investing in a smart thermostat when the old-fashioned one works perfectly well)—but acting now rather than later will not only shrink the size of next month’s checking account outflow, it begins what later will become much more substantive: an admirably efficient household with provably minimal operating costs.

For more real estate planning help (short- or long-term), call me! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

When respected observers like the editors of Barron’s are able to report that more than 10% of the country’s residential sales are now due to house-flipping, it’s a clear indication of the continuing strengthening in flipper activity. It’s now nearly back to 2006 levels.

By definition, house-flipping is the act of selling a home that has been owned for less than two years. Back in the early 2000s, the rapid escalation of residential prices created a hard-to-resist opportunity for anyone with enough cash for a down payment. There were ample examples of inexperienced Lewes, DE do-it-yourselfers who found success and quick profits with relatively little effort. Throughout the nation, holding periods could be brief as long as price appreciation reached runaway levels—right up until the bubble burst.

Needless to say, the global financial meltdown and resulting fallout quickly squelched the allure of house flipping. According to the industry trackers at CoreLogic, U.S. quarterly flipping rates slumped for the next five years. Although experienced professionals were able to profit from sharp-eyed buys and skillful rehabs, for the most part, the practice labored under something of a public relations cloud.  

But there’s little reason to worry that this go-round could cause another housing crisis. Experts agree that this time, the impetus for house flipping should be “less of a concern” (the Wall Street Journal). House-flipping “has evolved”—now dominated by pros who are buying older homes and converting them into the move-in ready residences today’s buyers prefer. According to CoreLogic, short-term flipping (6 months or less) is on the wane, partially due to more extensive renovation undertakings.

 The likely takeaway for Lewes, DE buyers and sellers should be encouraging. For owners of older properties who are unenthusiastic about undertaking renovations but anxious to move on, a healthy corps of house-flippers should provide prospective buyers. For house hunters eyeing this season’s previously owned Lewes, DE homes, the difference in value added by a thoroughgoing renewal can be well worth the premium asked—especially considering today’s low home loan terms. Call me to chat about this spring’s lively market! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

Once you’ve decided it’s time to sell your Lewes, DE house, you will have looked over the listings of neighboring properties and taken all the necessary steps to see that your own home stacks up well beside them. Before you go on the market, there’s one extra step that can make a sizeable difference in what happens next.

Now, if you have already recruited an experienced Lewes, DE agent, this next step won’t be necessary. But if you are still in the pre-consultation stage, having already brightened and lightened and de-cluttered, etc., here’s the immediate extra step that will serve you well:

Don’t even think about anything connected with your plans to sell the house for a few days. Do anything else. Disconnect from real estate entirely. In other words, try to take a clean break from everything connected with selling your house.

Then, reenergized and with an open mind, imagine you are one of the house hunters who will soon be crossing your threshold as actual prospects will be doing before long. Pretend you have just come from another house showing. You may have set up another appointment, too, so you won’t dawdle (but don’t rush, either—give it, say, 20 minutes).

And put yourself in a slightly skeptical frame of mind. Assume a slightly critical mindset; many prospective buyers will be suspicious of the possibility of hidden flaws. It’s why minor blemishes can generate undue concern. These are the “hidden dissuaders.”

·         The object of this pretend showing is to identify such blemishes. You may know that a long-standing stain on the kids’ bedroom ceiling isn’t anything to worry about (it’s been there forever)—but to a prospective buyer who spots it, that comfortable knowledge doesn’t exist.

·         If the utility mechanicals are tucked away in a dim, hard-to-examine corner, they could invite unnecessary apprehension. Adding simple overhead lighting will solve that—and help you spot the cobwebs you need to get rid of, too!

·         The scratches on the foyer flooring may be only natural for a house that’s been lived in—but if they’re too obvious, they can create a mood-killing first impression. Often, a few simple touchups can make them disappear.

Bottom line: after you’ve succeeded in making the obvious fixes, it will be money in the bank to attend to the minor flaws that were invisible before you readied the property.  

If you’ve already enlisted me to be your Realtor®, this particular exercise won’t be necessary. Together we’ll have discovered and found economical ways to do away with the hidden dissuaders before your listing goes online.

Do give me a call! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com