On Sunday, the end of Lewes, DE daylight savings time will have us all regaining the hour we lent ourselves last spring. That’s a realistic way to look at what we’re actually doing when we set our clocks backward. We should enjoy the extra snoozing time—we’ve earned it, and get to keep hold of it until next March 8.

If you’re wondering why the “d,” “s,” and “t” aren’t capitalized in that opening sentence, it’s because of the prodding of the British qa.com educational site. When it comes to daylight savings, we might think of them as the grammar police (although they’d probably rather have that, “grammar constables”).

British grammarians frequently share their exasperation at the way their language is mistreated by the rest of the English-speaking world. “Daylight Savings Time” seems to present a ripe opportunity.  They open the critique by declaring that the phrase is technically incorrect, despite its universal use throughout Australia, Canada, and the U.S. They say that the plural “savings” only became popular because of its similarity to everyday phrases like “savings account.” They point out that even “the U.S. Government Publishing Office style guide” agrees. For the record, that title should be “Government Publishing Office Style Manual.” Take that, qa.com!

But qa.com also wants all of Lewes, DE to straighten out and fly right—to start saying, “Daylight Saving Time,” no matter how weird that sounds. And that’s not all. They want everybody to stop capitalizing the “d,” “s,” and “t.” And yes—our own government grammar constables agree. It’s right there in the Manual. The Brits claim that the only reason everyone capitalizes it is because we want to make it such a big deal: to “emphasize its awesomeness,” they snicker.

Well, Sunday’s adjustment definitely WILL be a big deal for those of us who forget to set our clocks back an hour. If you’ve ever done that and suffered the consequences of being out of sync with the rest of Delaware, you know the truth in that. Also true: calling me when you need Lewes, DE real estate help is the correct move!  Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

This is the week that leads off with the Federal holiday that reminds us of the epic turning point of Christopher Columbus’ voyage of discovery—the day he arrived in the Americas. Lewes, DE’s Columbus Day is always celebrated on a Monday, which in 2019 is actually two days after Saturday, the actual date: October 12.

Celebrating Columbus Day on a weekend day wouldn’t have been much fun, so Monday is it. That solution was legalized in 1971, when Columbus Day was permanently moved to the second Monday in October. It’s no accident that this establishes a perpetually enshrined 3-day holiday weekend.

Because the arrival of the Europeans eventually resulted in today’s modern world, replacing almost every vestige of the indigenous cultures which preceded it, there is much debate about whether this should be cause for celebration. Here in the U.S.A. (except in North Dakota, Hawaii, and Alaska) it continues to be observed and debated, as it is in Spain, Mexico, Argentina, Venezuela, Columbia, and Chile. In 1957, Canada adroitly sidestepped the whole controversy by declaring that a Canadian Thanksgiving will fall on the second Monday in October. Clever, those Canadians…

Italian American organizations vigorously defend the holiday, although Italy does not. Possibly Italy still smarts from the costly mistake of having allowed Spain to sponsor the voyage (but Genoa, at least, does have a heroic statue of the explorer).

Banks take the day off, as do most U.S. schools, courts, post offices, and government offices in general. Most Lewes, DE businesses and offices are less committed: it’s said that they recognize Columbus Day, but don’t necessarily observe it.

Whether or not Lewes, DE’s Columbus Day is a major observance in your household or business, here’s wishing your extended weekend is a marvelous one! Afterward, when it’s back to discovering Lewes, DE real estate, I hope you’ll give me a ring! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

 Last week ended with some good news that can affect many Lewes, DE real estate transactions—specifically some with bottom lines equal to $400,000 or less. It came in the form of a rule change from Washington’s rule-makers, and whether or not it applies to your own property, it may signal a shift in regulatory outlook.

 Many Lewes, DE real estate transactions are subject to Federal regulations—rules devised to ensure the soundness of the financial institutions that provide home loans. Theoretically, everyone who buys or sells Lewes, DE real estate should benefit from legal regulations that restrain lenders from granting loans too easily. When that takes place, widespread “easy money” usually results in the kind of abrupt return to reality we saw in the last decade. Nobody wants that!

One way regulators prevent residential real estate “bubbles” is by seeing that home loans are legitimately collateralized—that home loan amounts don’t exceed the real value of the underlying properties. That’s realized by requiring that strictly professional appraisals be performed. Appraisals demonstrate that homes true values equal or exceed proposed loan amounts.

But—it’s always a balancing act. Appraisals take time and cost money—making buying and selling that much more cumbersome. Any regulation that is too strict unnecessarily retards legitimate Lewes, DE real estate transactions. Over time, that’s what had happened with the appraisal requirement.

Last Friday an official press release announced a lightening of the appraisal requirement. The Federal Reserve, FDIC, and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency “have adopted a final rule that increases the threshold for residential real estate transactions…from $250,000 to $400,000.”

The rule change was made after consultation with various consumer protection entities to ensure that upping the threshold for appraisals wouldn’t be overly liberal. Since 25 years have passed since the last adjustment, inflation alone probably validated the decision.

For qualifying Lewes, DE real estate transactions, it will be a welcome change. Part of my job is to see that your own real estate initiatives surmount all the legal and technical hurdles with a minimum of fuss. Call me!    Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

 According to Alina Dizik, one of the leading Wall Street Journal’s real estate commentators, a growing number of luxury homeowners are finding new appreciation for an old idea. In fact, the older, the better.

Pursuing a way to enhance the feel of modern homes, more and more homeowners are “getting into the groove” of reclaiming ancient materials—especially old wood. Antique timbers from old New England barn sidings have long been recycled, but usually only for walls. Now other uses are being found to add character to otherwise unexceptional rooms. For Lewes, DE homeowners looking to update their own homes, looking to the past might be an idea worth thinking about.

The Journal highlights a successful example in a Minnesota couple who used 1900s-era oak fencing to create an unusual dining-room ceiling. They liked the effect so much that they located some 1850s midwestern barn wood to use as exterior siding—then used the hand-hewn beams to look like support beams. “That’s the first thing people talk about,” according to the owner.

Now the search for reclaimed wood isn’t limited to barns. Materials from log cabins and factories originally built in the 1800s can be worthy prizes—as long as “they look as primitive as possible.” Today’s timber doesn’t supply the same look and feel as the more ancient wood because fast-growth techniques used by suppliers don’t create the same effect as do the antique hardwoods. Harsh weather—lots of it—makes the difference. While new wood tends to shrink “or cup and bow,” the old stuff just hardens—and looks terrific when contrasted against modern surfaces.

Despite its growing popularity and the obvious limit to how much can be reclaimed, dealers claim that Lewes, DE homeowners might find ample supply. Agents rely on word-of-mouth to claim structure that a being dismantled, so “it just keeps on coming.”

The old-materials-contrasted-with-new is an idea that may not leap to mind when Lewes, DE homeowners consider updating, but when it’s well done, can add unique appeal. Whenever you’re thinking of original ways to add value to your own Lewes, DE home, I hope you’ll give me a call! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com