Downsizing has gotten a lot of attention as Baby Boomers—many of whom have become empty-nesters—discover that they don’t need the space, expense, and elbow grease required to keep up the family property. But there is a counter-trend that could well explain the popularity (and desirability) of many big ol’ Rehoboth Beach, DE homes. It’s a multigenerational thing.

It was to be expected that multigenerational family households became more numerous following the Great Recession. After all, when jobs became scarce, incomes stagnated, and foreclosure rates skyrocketed, the idea of moving back home with mom and dad became a practical necessity for many Rehoboth Beach, DE families.

Enter the term “multigenerational family living.” It’s defined as the inclusion of two or more adult generations—or including grandparents and grandchildren under 25 years of age—in a single residence. That lifestyle choice had been steadily declining from 21% in 1950 to 12% thirty years later. But beginning in 1980, that trend reversed—sharply so, during the economic turmoil of 2007-2009. Although that rapid increase has since slowed, today it is still on the rise.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 51.5 million Americans lived in multigenerational households in 2009 (that’s 17% of the entire population). Compare that with the latest count from Pew Research, which registered 60.6 million (19%) in 2014.

Pew explains part of the trend as a cultural phenomenon stemming from the growing diversity of the U.S. population. Cultural preferences among some Asian and Hispanic groups—as well as with some foreign-born Americans—tilt toward multigenerational living. But in recent years, young adults make up the age group “most likely” to add to the trend. Previously, the elderly had led the way, but by 2014, for young adults aged 18 through 34, living with parents surpassed other living arrangements for the first time ever.

What this means for Rehoboth Beach, DE home sellers is simply that there is a measurable counter-trend to the more widely publicized downsizing phenomenon. Whether your own residence is right-sized for multiple generations or single ones, there are buyers out there eager to take a look tour. Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

A $180 Million Lotto Winner’s Massive Mountain Estate” was the headline in the Wall Street Journal’s “Real Estate” section. The photo above the headline really did look to be many millions of dollars’ worth of breathtaking. The panorama behind the stone-and-brick estate, perched on a California mountainside, provided an unobstructed 180-degree view of the valley far below. The lush landscaping around the mansion’s acreage was the very definition of “pristine” (literally, since the forest of trees was definitely newly-planted, lottery-winner style).

The surprise for Milton, DE  readers is that the article was not another expected retelling about a big lottery winner who lost it all. The former roofing company employee and Mega Millions winner was not, in fact, wallowing in debt and crushed relationships. In fact, the story was about accomplishing the kind of real estate coup that usually plays out only in daydreams.  

Rick Knudsen used to look up from the front porch of his 4-bedroom home to view the progress of an enormous house being constructed on the side of distant Little San Gorgonio mountain. Then he bought the lottery ticket, won, retired, and plunked down $5.5 million for the not-yet-completed mansion. Then, “just bam bam bam…within three months, I owned it all,” he says, recounting how he added an adjoining 155-acre buffalo ranch and its accompanying steakhouse and saloon; then (why not?) another 640-acre parcel. And a home for each of his 5 kids.

The best part of this lottery/real estate story lies not with the details of the 16,000 square feet of living space in the new digs, nor the elevator, car collector’s garage, gym, wine cellar, the 5 ½ mile hiking and driving trail, stocked fishing pond, nor the 17-seat movie theater. It’s not in how the 45 grass-and-apple fed buffalo are served at the steakhouse, nor that, all in, he spent just $11.5 million for the entire domain—purchases all “driven by feeling” rather than investment returns.

The best part might be that he hooked up with the right financial manager, so he’s worth more today than when he won the lottery. Or it might be what comprises a second, less luck-driven windfall, since he’s just listed the entire assemblage for a not unrealistic $26 million. The reason he’s selling? Because assembling the domain was so much fun, he’s eager to tackle another challenge.

If you are ready to open the book on your own Milton, DE  real estate story, luck doesn’t need to play a leading role. Just give me a call! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com

Last week South Bethany, DE homeowners’ peace of mind would have been strengthened by some words that received wide circulation throughout the financial press. Their author was a gentleman whose opinions are as close to bankable as anyone currently on the scene. If there were such a thing as a Nobel Prize in real estate, this guy would own one—come to think of it, he DOES have a Nobel prize (for economics), but his work largely centers on the U.S. real estate market.

We’re talking about Robert Shiller, the Yale professor who co-invented the Case-Shiller Index. It’s the most economically respected measure of U.S home prices. South Bethany, DE homeowners who measure their own financial wherewithal usually consider the market price of their South Bethany, DE home as a major contributor to their net worth—the personal financial ultimate bottom line. As Wall Street’s MarketWatch put it, “what’s more natural than wanting to know the value of our biggest assets?

That’s why the trajectory of home values in the months and years ahead are of more than passing interest—and why the views of Professor Shiller make headlines. Among other prescient pronouncements, he foresaw the past decade’s housing crash and subsequent financial meltdown—and penned an article predicting it a full year in advance.

The latest S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller Home Price Index did report some slowing—but that was a slowing in the rate of price increases, rather than a true slowdown. Still, after years of constantly upbeat statistical news, it’s not surprising that Shiller’s views on what’s next got wide coverage when CNBC interviewed him last week.

What the straight-talking economist had to say was welcome news for South Bethany, DE homeowners. When the interviewer brought up possible fears of a major downturn in home equity like the previous decade’s housing bubble, Shiller replied, “it’s not the same.” On the contrary, addressing home values in the immediate future, he was definite: “I don’t expect a sharp turn in the housing market.”

Much of the U.S. slowdown in home sales has to do with a lack of inventory: homeowners willing to sell. If you are one of South Bethany, DE’s homeowners, you can take that as a green light for listing your own property in today’s market. If that’s you, I hope you’ll give me a call! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com